Thread: Buying a BMCC and accessories. Am I missing anything?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1 Buying a BMCC and accessories. Am I missing anything? 
    How's this look for you guys? My budget is right around here, I definitely don't want to push it anymore. Am I missing anything? Should I swap anything out?

    -Blackmagic Design Cinema Camera with MFT Mount
    -Metabones Nikon G Lens to Blackmagic 2.5k Cinema Camera with Micro-4/3 Mount Speed Booster
    -Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Lens for Nikon
    -Manfrotto MVH500AH Flat Base Fluid Head, 055XB Tripod Legs, Padded Case Kit
    -SHAPE Blackmagic Handheld Cage Kit
    -SHAPE Lens Support
    -SanDisk Extreme II Internal SSD (240GB)
    -B+W 72mm UV Haze MRC 010M Filter
    -Hoya 72mm Neutral Density (NDX8) 0.9 Filter
    -Pelican 1510 Carry On Case with Foam Set (Black)

    Thanks!

    Side question: Based on all the customer reviews on bhphoto, it looks like the EF mount is much more popular. Should I maybe consider the EF? (I don't have any lenses currently)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    36
    I'd try to swap the Sandisk with either the Extreme I or another one from Blackmagic's supported list. The Extreme II has a slimmer design and while people have successfully used it, it won't be a snug fit in the camera.

    The next firmware release is supposed to have an autofocus function(?) for the ef mount - if that's important for you at all.
    Otherwise if you want the speed booster and the ability to adapt a wider range of lenses, mft mount all the way. There is no difference between the ef and mft mount version besides the mft being a passive mount, which means no iris & focus control in camera.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    105
    Quote Originally Posted by nihal View Post
    which means no iris control in camera.
    That's a good thing! Stupid auto-iris...
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Senior Member jambredz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Kingston, Jamaica
    Posts
    4,388
    You can get Kingston hyper x ssd drives. 240gb for $140 now. I'd ditch the extreme ii for reasons already stated. Also why only one ND filter? You are gonna need more. Look into the hoya PRO ND set and also hoya IR cut filter. IR pollution is going to be an issue. Also i dont see a battery solution on that list.
    Darren Scott
    Freelance Director/Director of Photography


    https://vimeo.com/jambredzvisions/videos
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Senior Member Akin A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    159
    Hoya UV and IR Cut Filter is a must: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...mm_UV_and.html

    I suggest the following:

    Use at least 77mm (82mm is even better) filters instead of 72mm filters, because your next lens might have 77mm+ front threads.
    - example - Sigma 50mm/1.4 Art has 77mm threads.

    Btw, if you don't think you'll need a 50mm at some point, you might change your mind if you try to shoot a close-up (chin to top of head) on that 35mm end of the 18-35 on a BMCC, because the actor's head will start to distort. Even more if you're using it with the speed booster. For a medium close-up (chest to top of head), 35mm on BMCC, with no speed booster is fine.

    The Hoya UV and IR Cut filter makes the B+W filter unnecessary.

    That Hoya 0.9 ND filter is weak on a sunny day. I used to have it. Outdoors, if you want shallow DOF, more than 3 stops of light will need to be blocked.
    You can either get a set of Hoya ProNDs, like these guys here use, or if you can't afford it, you can get a variable ND that doesn't have a reputation of softening your image too much. I use the Hoya 77mm Variable Density Filter and I like it, but I haven't scientifically tested it to see how it effects image sharpness.

    If you plan to shoot raw, I'd get either two 240GB SSDs or a 480GB SSD. I use a 480GB and will eventually get another 480GB.

    I own the EF model because I thought it would have a higher resale value if I sold it to Canon DSLR users who wanted to upgrade and keep their EF lenses. If I was to do it again, I would probably go with MFT, so that I could use the speed booster to get S35 FOV and that extra light into the sensor.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #6  
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    99
    As Akin says budget for at least a 480GB SSD but I would go for a Digistor as the Sandisk II's and Kingstons have both had problems reported.

    I note you also haven't budgeted for batteries (unless at least one is included in the cage kit.) Anton Bauer have the rep but they tend to be expensive. V mounts are heavy but are generally cheaper.

    In the case of filters I'd settle for 82mm with step up rings. You can also get 4" x 4" filter plates with 82mm screw threads so any 82mm round filter can be used on a matte box. You might also need IR cut filters in addition to NDs.

    I'm not sure if the Shape cage kit includes a follow focus or a matte box, but both make the BMCC a much easier beast to tame.

    35mm on BMCC with BMCC speedbooster is the quivalent of 54mm lens on a full frame 35mm camera but increases to 84mm if you just use a Nikon G to M43 adaptor which is generally the minimum you would want for chest to head shots, as Akin says. I'm not sure if you will get distortion but you may not get a flattering perspective as you move to full face.

    Manfrotto fluid heads are generally 'orrible so you might be able to find cheaper and better alternatives.

    Oh, and a must have is either an EVF or a magnifying loupe accessory (eg. Munz or Grid). The BMCC is a bitch in the cold hard light of day.

    If you want to stay cheap look for quality second hand gear. My complete and comprehensive rig would retail for about $10,000+ but have managed to keep it around $4,500. with some savy purchases.
    Last edited by catscratch; 05-14-2014 at 10:23 PM.
    The Blackmagic Design Cinema Camera - what it says on the box!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #7  
    Taking a Vacation
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    4,632
    What everyone else said and you absolutely need a different tripod and head. You literally will be wasting your money on that thing. It says 11 pounds but there's no way you want to max that thing out. It's best for maybe a DSLR but you'll still get kickback and jerks. It's just the nature of the beast with those Monfrottos.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #8  
    SOUND: If you feed a mic into the camera inputs, your sound's going to be abysmal. JuicedLink makes a pre-amp that's supposed to be nice. I have a Tascam DR60 4-track. Feed my Sennheiser MK6 shotgun into the Tascam's XLR, add whatever other sources to XLR or mini phones on Tascam, then run a stereo mini Y to (2) 1/4" mono phone plugs into the BMCC. Record at 48khz or 96khz/24 bit dual mono and you're golden. You'll end up with two nice recordings (one on the Tascam and one in camera) for safety. The tracks on the Tascam will sound best, but for a lot of interview work, the already synched audio on the camera is very good and saves a lot of time.

    BATTERIES: As someone commented below, you're going to need batteries. The built-in is good for nothing except keeping the camera running if your external goes dead during a scene. You can go with the pro set up and buy Anton Bauer, but you're going to pay about a quarter what you spent on the camera itself. The BMCC will accept anything from 12 to 30 volts, so there are a lot of options, especially if you don't mind doing a little soldering. I just ordered two sealed lead-acid 12v batteries with charger for < $100. I'll put a D-tap on them. Yes, they're heavy -- 3#s, but they're >3ah (100 minutes continuous runtime each) and I'll swap them for the counterweight already on my rig or clip to belt/tripod. There are plenty of lightweight lithium 12v - 18v batteries available if you can't take the weight. They just won't look as cool as a Bauer on a V-mount.

    NDs: I keep the ISO at its native 400 to max the dynamic range, I only adjust it in an extreme circumstance. Most lenses are going to give their best performance in the middle of their f/ range (NOT true of the Sigma, however, which tests suggest is sharp from 1.8). That only leaves shutter angle to vary for exposure, so I use a variable ND. Light Craft makes the nicest I've found.

    HEAD: I have the Manfrotto 504 head and it's been up to the task. It's not the smoothest panning head I've ever used, but it works and will carry the weight no problem.

    SHAPE: I haven't played with one of these, but it looks nice. I have tried the Wooden Camera cage -- built like a tank and lots of attachment points, but honestly, hand-holding a BMCC isn't easy. If you intend to use the Shape on a tripod, you're good. If you're thinking of handlebars, it's do-able, but you have to work at it to get smooth footage.

    MONITOR: Shooting indoors is no problem, but outdoors in any kind of light is a headache. The screen just isn't bright enough. One solution is to buy a 5-7" monitor and mount it (problem: most of the low-end monitors are HDMI, not SDI, so you're looking at another ~$100 for a converter or +$100 in cost for an SDI monitor). Or you can try to block the sun. An old-fashioned photographer's cloth draped over your head works pretty well in a pinch.

    MOUNT: As a starting point the Sigma should give great performance with a 35mm equivalent of 21mm to 50mm on MFT with SpeedBooster. There is no SpeedBooster for EF, so your Sigma would look like a 35mm equivalent of 43mm-84mm on the BMCC with EF mount. I got the MFT mount bc I believed the BS that there are "many" wonderful MFT lenses available at good prices. There really aren't. Hopefully someone on here can enlighten me on where to look, b.c. I've looked at the test data for everything < 24mm. There are also few "alternative" lenses (C-mount Super16 film lenses, video lenses) that will fully cover the BMCC sensor (18mm image circle) at the wide end (tho many will cover at the longer end). I already have L-series Canon glass from my 7d and am STILL waiting for Metabones to produce a dumb EF -> MFT SpeedBooster. To be sure, there are some nice MFT and Nikon lenses out there, but if you're expecting razor sharpness with low distortion and no CA, you're looking at Zeiss CPs (available in EF or MFT) and a handful of L-series Canon lenses. The Samyangs are plenty sharp, but the 14mm has pretty strong distortion, if you can live with that. Many of the MFT lenses are made for specific Panasonic/Sony/Olympus cameras and rely on firmware image correction built into that specific camera to achieve the test results you see online. When you take them off their mated camera, many show distortion and CA. If you're looking for the benchmark standard, check out the Zeiss 21mm Distagon, which is the sharpest and most well-behaved SLR lens made, comes in Nikon and Canon mount. The Sigma is a close second to the Distagon, waaaaay cheaper and better than most L-series Canons in test data, though the samples I've seen look a little "cold" to me, whereas the Canons are more neutral and the Zeiss has a slightly warmer look to my eyes. A problem with the EF mount is that there's no Metabones SpeedBooster so you'll either have to try one of the other boosters out there (some are below, I'll be checking those out), or you need a superwide lens to get a big angle of view. Superwide = $$$ for premium performance. The Canon superwides are very good, but not great. So, Nikon -> SpeedBooster -> MFT still gives you the most options, just not the options the forums suggest.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #9  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Linz
    Posts
    248
    MOUNT: I got the EF mount just out of convenience, and often thought about the beauty of the Speedbooster.
    After pairing my BMCC with the Sigma 10-20 3,5 and working with the footage a lot, I have to say that I really love it. In PhotoshopRAW you can eleminate CA's, which it has, and it looks quite unreal when corrected.
    The 18-35, as the doctor said, will be a nice low tele zoom, which covers my main reaches.
    If you want to shoot in LowLight, 18-35+SB it is!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #10  
    Taking a Vacation
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    4,632
    Not sure I agree with all that info. Considering the cams native ASA is 800.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Tags for this Thread

View Tag Cloud

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •