Thread: Jellyfish that's not sushi?

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  1. #1 Jellyfish that's not sushi? 
    I love the idea of an easy to use shared network drive.

    https://lumaforge.com/jellyfish

    It just makes so much sense. Seems like it would be better than everyone having their own RAID and individually transferring their data and then individually archiving it. This just makes so much sense to me.

    The handle on the top really makes it for me. Take it with you where ever you go? Maybe we'll see it in bright orange rubber soon. A drop proof NAS?

    I'm curious if it's one of those great ideas that has some hidden flaw.

    Has anyone here worked on one?
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  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by Marshall Harrington View Post
    I love the idea of an easy to use shared network drive.

    https://lumaforge.com/jellyfish

    It just makes so much sense. Seems like it would be better than everyone having their own RAID and individually transferring their data and then individually archiving it. This just makes so much sense to me.

    The handle on the top really makes it for me. Take it with you where ever you go? Maybe we'll see it in bright orange rubber soon. A drop proof NAS?

    I'm curious if it's one of those great ideas that has some hidden flaw.

    Has anyone here worked on one?
    I haven't used one, but from working in a small-ish company with 9 workstations between editing and compositing, I can tell you that the main factor for still staying on multiple external raids rather than a centralized system, is mostly price.
    If we had to move all our files and projects (around 260 terabytes) in a Jellyfish system, we would need to spend atleast 80.000$ to configure one of those Jellyfish systems (not counting for a backup system). And that's money you can't easily "pass" on the client, you can't charge more for your editing because you're using a better storage solution.
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  3. #3  
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    Good alternative. https://youtu.be/8eX9wpWpBRM
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  4. #4  
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    This are all nice but my experience was not a good one. Although things are much better now a days, I was an early adopter of these kind of NAS drives. Ours was from a known manufacturer too. But when they sold that division to a small company, support suffered and then they just disappeared entirely. Right around when they went out of business, our NAS started to flake out. Long story short, the OS is a modified Linux with proprietary drivers that to date, I am unable to start the NAS and have visibility to the drives. All our images on it has been hostage by this failure and we're not able to recover it. It's now seating in a cabinet waiting for a way that we can just get the data out. One hard lesson learn is also to back up any NAS.
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  5. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshall Harrington View Post
    It just makes so much sense.
    8K RED camera make sense too, before you see it's price.

    Quote Originally Posted by MasterOfWombats View Post
    I haven't used one, but from working in a small-ish company with 9 workstations between editing and compositing, I can tell you that the main factor for still staying on multiple external raids rather than a centralized system, is mostly price.
    If we had to move all our files and projects (around 260 terabytes) in a Jellyfish system, we would need to spend atleast 80.000$ to configure one of those Jellyfish systems (not counting for a backup system). And that's money you can't easily "pass" on the client, you can't charge more for your editing because you're using a better storage solution.
    Totally agreed.
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  6. #6  
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    Lots of companies that make products like this roll over and play dead and the users are stuck not being able to get their data.
    It even happens when biggies like Microsoft decide to shut down a company they own.
    You're way better off with products that are more standard and can be moved from platform to platform.
    Not as convenient but way more reliable.
    It gets even sketchier if they're a start up.
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  7. #7  
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    Ugh, $ 21,995 for a 96 TB unit with 70 TB avail? And that's the price without any warranty option. A 3 years warranty adds $ 2,495

    So:
    Latest helium filled enterprise HDDs Seagate Exos X X16 with 16TB and 2.5 mio hours MTBF cost ~$ 425 ... 8x 425 = $ 3,400 for 112 TB with 91,5 TB avail.
    Plus the QNAP TVS-872XT-i5-16G with a single 10GBit NIC for ~ $ 1.800

    That makes $ 5.200 + extended QNAP warranty to 5 years for $ 399,-

    Plenty of money left to pay an external IT guy for support when needed.
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  8. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Niessner View Post
    Ugh, $ 21,995 for a 96 TB unit with 70 TB avail? And that's the price without any warranty option. A 3 years warranty adds $ 2,495

    So:
    Latest helium filled enterprise HDDs Seagate Exos X X16 with 16TB and 2.5 mio hours MTBF cost ~$ 425 ... 8x 425 = $ 3,400 for 112 TB with 91,5 TB avail.
    Plus the QNAP TVS-872XT-i5-16G with a single 10GBit NIC for ~ $ 1.800

    That makes $ 5.200 + extended QNAP warranty to 5 years for $ 399,-

    Plenty of money left to pay an external IT guy for support when needed.
    So true. You could even put it in a 10GB copper wire 5e or 6 network raid enclosure for a lot less. And how dumb are your collaborators? This stuff is pretty simple.
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  9. #9  
    I DO HEAR all the comments regarding the high price and long term practicality of any of the recent NAS. Some good thinking here. When I'm working on my own my individual raid is just fine. But once you're with teams keeping each players contribution to the project on their system, then organizing it into the primary edit, as well as keeping all the different work stations archived… well that's can be a full-time job that is often lacking IMHO. I totally agree paying $20K+ is not a great solution. Which is why I'm reaching out.

    The example I got to experience was on a project that it was budgeted for and I think like many of you have stated, it cost a lot. But even with it's large cost they claimed it more then paid for itself with the ease which the data was handled as well as the ease of archiving. Mind you it wasn't a huge size. Just the primary project.

    As we all move to faster systems I'd sure love to find one a smaller one device that would help solve this problem in a long term sort of way.

    Could this be Blackmagic's toolbox?
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  10. #10  
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    Marshall, I think besides building a dedicated Linux server the QNAP solution looks to be the most promising and cost effective.
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