Thread: Light Meter Calibration

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29
  1. #21  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    151
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]
    Shot on veydra 35mm at a 2.8. My sekonic 758 lines up really well for log on the p4k.

    Definitely try a front light when your testing charts.
    Attached Images
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #22  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,046
    Quote Originally Posted by rze View Post
    Since you have more of a 3/4 side light, did you angle the grey card towards the key light? If you want to be more precise, do a front light over camera for the test.
    rze how could i light meter for the shot below? i usually just have the dome facing the camera and i put the meter below my mouth by my chin. is that the right way or should i face the dome towards my key instead of the camera. i hate deer lighting. i want mood. thanks in advance

    shot.jpg
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #23  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by jsfilmz View Post
    rze how could i light meter for the shot below? i usually just have the dome facing the camera and i put the meter below my mouth by my chin. is that the right way or should i face the dome towards my key instead of the camera. i hate deer lighting. i want mood. thanks in advance

    shot.jpg
    Face the dome towards the key. The way I do it is that I use incident readings for key lights and fill, and spot meters for background exposure readings. Then you don't need to worry about the spot being a reading for exposing for middle grey. For your moody style, regardless of the color of the background your going to be looking for a spot reading 2-4 stops down from your key light depending on how moody. You don't seem like a backlight guy, but because of the law of cosines its a little difficult to meter. I'll usually go off a monitor I trust for fill and backlight levels since their the most delicate for low key cinematography, but if you want to use the meter, run tests for backlight with incident reading matching the key, then 1 stop up and 1 stop down and see what you like. Also for low key cinematography, 2 or even 3 stops down for key lights is totally acceptable, you just allways need your backgrounds to be under the key light.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #24  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,046
    Quote Originally Posted by rze View Post
    Face the dome towards the key. The way I do it is that I use incident readings for key lights and fill, and spot meters for background exposure readings. Then you don't need to worry about the spot being a reading for exposing for middle grey. For your moody style, regardless of the color of the background your going to be looking for a spot reading 2-4 stops down from your key light depending on how moody. You don't seem like a backlight guy, but because of the law of cosines its a little difficult to meter. I'll usually go off a monitor I trust for fill and backlight levels since their the most delicate for low key cinematography, but if you want to use the meter, run tests for backlight with incident reading matching the key, then 1 stop up and 1 stop down and see what you like. Also for low key cinematography, 2 or even 3 stops down for key lights is totally acceptable, you just allways need your backgrounds to be under the key light.
    Rze thanks man. In that shot my bg was about 2.5 stops under. I dont have any flags and im in a tiny ass room so i cant get it to drop anymore. Thanks for the tips man. Ill save up for some decent light meter hahaha
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #25  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,046
    Is this under exposed? I dont have a good monitor. I just want to know what you guys are seeing. I love low key lighting so bad and im trying to learnunder_1.1.1.jpg.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #26  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,046
    And this one is much lower.

    Attachment 27365
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #27  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by jsfilmz View Post
    Is this under exposed? I dont have a good monitor. I just want to know what you guys are seeing. I love low key lighting so bad and im trying to learnunder_1.1.1.jpg.
    You can also use a waveform in davinci, your key is in the low 40s where you should probably be 45-50 so its slightly underexposed, but by so little that its a non issue. Plus if you like the way it looks you exposed correctly.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #28  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,046
    Quote Originally Posted by rze View Post
    You can also use a waveform in davinci, your key is in the low 40s where you should probably be 45-50 so its slightly underexposed, but by so little that its a non issue. Plus if you like the way it looks you exposed correctly.
    Rze i cant live without the waveform hahaha. When you tell me its in the 40s are you looking at the highlights on my face? The brightest part?Thanks man sorry with all the questions. I really need to invest in a calibrated monitor
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #29  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,046
    Where do you guys aim a spot meter on the face? The forehead?
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Another Light Meter App
    By frle in forum Cinematography
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-20-2016, 02:21 PM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-03-2016, 11:09 AM
  3. Why I use a Light Meter instead of ETTR
    By Mike Collier in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 12-02-2013, 10:19 AM
  4. Vaiable ND and light meter
    By teh in forum Lens Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-08-2013, 12:47 PM
  5. Replies: 27
    Last Post: 02-15-2013, 03:30 AM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •